Thursday, 28 June 2018 01:32

Hungary – Propaganda media takes story from fake news websites

June media monitoring highlight for Hungary. Origo took the story from Infowars, a known fake news website that, in turn, had taken the story from Voice of Europe, another known fake news website.

 This article is part of the Media Monitoring Highlights of June, a monthly overview of the most significant results of our monitoring of traditional and new media in Belgium, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, and the United Kingdom.

origo plus image schoolDate of publication:  22 June 2018

Media outlet: Origo is a pro-government news portal. It changed its editorial stance in 2015, moving from being critical of the Fidesz-led government to becoming more government-friendly in its political reporting

Link: https://goo.gl/jSs6Se 

Headline: “In Linz, they force Austrians to sing Islamic songs”

Description of the anti-Muslim content: Muslims are blamed for causing tension in Austrian schools. They are portrayed as intolerant and authoritarian in forcing children to sing Islamic songs and to wear traditional garments. The assertion that a non-Muslim pupil (“intimidated children”) was singing an Islamic song at home was described by Origo as an outrage. 

Myth debunked:  The article has no reliable sources. Those people who are quoted, such as “a Viennese teacher”, “the Muslim teacher”, “the mother”, are not named, nor is the name of the school at the centre of the controversy. Origo took the story from Infowars, a known fake news website that, in turn, had taken the story from Voice of Europe, another known fake news website. Origo, as a propaganda media outlet, publishes stories like this to back the government agenda and fuel anger against Muslims in Europe and Hungary. 

More to read:

The state of the Hungarian press on world press day

Origo's panic attack

 

 

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