Wednesday, 25 April 2018 12:51

Hungary – Sensationalism won’t solve antisemitism

April media monitoring highlight for Hungary. “Outrageous: it was an Arab and not a Jew who was attacked by a Syrian migrant in Berlin”

This article is part of the Media Monitoring Highlights of April, a monthly overview of the most significant results of our monitoring of traditional and new media in Belgium, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, and the United Kingdom.

888.hu AprilDate of publication: 20 April 2018

Media outlet: 888.hu

About the source: 888.hu is a Hungarian right wing news outlet which mainly publishes opinion pieces. 

Author: Vincze Viktor Attila, journalist

Link: https://goo.gl/w2gdbp

Headline: “Outrageous: it was an Arab and not a Jew who was attacked by a Syrian migrant in Berlin”

Description of the anti-Muslim content: This article reports on an Israeli Arab in Berlin who was attacked by a young Syrian refugee mistakenly thinking that he was Jewish. The victim, Adam, and his friend were attacked while walking on the street. They were wearing kippahs, the Jewish skullcaps, because a friend from Israel had told Adam that it was too dangerous to wear one in Berlin and he wanted to test it out. The article frames the story in a very sensationalist way in order to put the blame for anti-Semitism on Muslim refugees. 

Myth Debunked: While the German police database registered that 90 percent of all antisemitic crimes are committed by far-right individuals, other studies, such as The head of Germany’s Central Council of Muslims said that antisemitism is sinful  showed that German respondents’ mainly perceive perpetrators as having a Muslim background. In Germany there is a gap in research when it comes to perpetrators’ backgrounds in violent antisemitic incidents. In any case, it is wrong to generalise and stigmatize a whole community on the basis of acts by a group of them. After the antisemitic attack against the Israeli Arab in Berlin, representatives of the Muslim communities in Germany condemned the attack. The head of Germany’s Central Council of Muslims said that antisemitism is sinful and must be tackled. Muslim women at the “Kippah march” worn the skullcap over their hijabs in solidarity with Jewish community. And Berlin State Secretary, of Palestinian background, said in a video on Twitter "I am shaken to the core and appalled and ashamed of this man who speaks my language."Antisemitism in Berlin is certainly a problem that needs to be addressed, but it did not start in 2015 with the arrival of Syrian refugees. 

More to read:

An Author's Quest to Explain Muslim Anti-Semitism

Rethinking empathy: emotions triggered by the Holocaust among Muslim-minority in Germany

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